Tag: marketing an open source project

Marketing an open-source project – Part VII – Survey results

This is the seventh post of the “Marketing an Open Source Project” series. This blog entry reveals insights from a survey on open-source software (OSS) community marketing. If you haven’t read the first article, you can find it here. Interview results The interview that was distributed online gathered a total of thirteen respondents. Firstly, I…

Marketing an open-source project – Part VI

This is the sixth post of the “Marketing an Open Source Project” series. This blog entry aims to explain the aim of the conducted research, which methodology approach was used and what are the known limitations of the findings. If you haven’t read the first article, you can find it here. METHODOLOGY The two main…

Marketing an open-source project – Part V. Linux as a case study

This is the fifth post of the “Marketing an Open Source Project” series. I will discuss the success of Linux as a prominent example of Open Source Software (OSS). Highlighting Linux’s early achievements, its role in the Android operating system, and its dominance in the mobile and global operating system markets. The post also delves…

Marketing an open-source project – Part III. What is marketing?

In this third post of the “Marketing an Open Source Project” series. I explore the key concepts related to marketing and branding. The goal is to provide insights into the evolving role of marketing, the significance of branding, and the importance of brand awareness and image in shaping consumer decisions and company performance, with the…

Marketing an open-source project – Part II

In this second post of the “Marketing an Open Source Project” series, I provide a brief overview of what will be addressed in future posts and explain why this topic is so relevant for open-source communities.If you haven’t read the first article, you can find it here. The open-source software (OSS) movement, while not new,…

Marketing an open-source project – Part I

Hey there,  I’d like to start by saying that I started this research back in 2017 and wrapped it up by 2019. Even though I’ve come across heaps of new discussions on the subject since then, the core findings are as valid today as they were back then. But before we dive into the essence…